Download MBB Network & Wireless Cards Driver

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Feb 04, 2021 BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – The Texas A&M at Arkansas men’s basketball game scheduled for Saturday (Feb. 6) has been postponed due to a combination of positive tests, contact tracing and subsequent. Verizon has changed up the Prepaid MBB Portal as well! From a computer with internet access, download the software and then install it on the target computer. Once the software is installed I'm thinking you should be able to add money and purchase a data plan.

A mobile broadband (MBB) device provides a mobile computer with a wireless data connection to a cellular service. An MBB device supports one or more cellular radio technologies, such as GSM, 3G, CDMA, or LTE. MBB devices in modern standby platforms are all required to provide the same set of power management capabilities and to implement the same general hardware configuration, regardless of the specific cellular technologies supported.

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The MBB device is expected to use Universal Serial Bus (USB) to connect to the modern standby platform, and to use software provided by Microsoft for all connectivity and power management operations. Windows includes an inbox Mobile Broadband Class Driver, which provides a standardized interface for mobile broadband data transfer, connection management, and power management for MBB radios. The following guidance focuses on power management for MBB devices that are integrated inside the mobile computer chassis. MBB devices that connect to an external USB port are not discussed.

During modern standby (when the screen is off), the MBB device is expected to be in a low-power state. How much power the MBB device consumes in this low-power state depends on whether the user has provisioned the MBB device on the cellular network. If the MBB device is provisioned and the radio in the device is currently enabled by the user for a data connection, the device should be in a low-power connected-sleep mode in which the device's USB function is in the D2 (suspend) device power state. However, if the MBB device has not been provisioned on the network or the user has disabled the radio for a data connection, the device should be in a low-power radio-off mode. In radio-off mode, the MBB device has only enough power applied to respond to host commands over the USB interface.

The implementation of MBB device power management for a modern standby platform is based on the following:

  • The user-controlled radio power state of the MBB device.
  • The USB bus suspend and resume transitions.

The MBB device must be able to enter a low-power D2 (suspend) state after the MBB radio is turned off and the USB bus interface enters the suspend state. All sleep and wake power transitions must be signaled over the USB bus. There is no support for out-of-band GPIO signaling to initiate MBB device power transitions or to interrupt the main processor on the System on a Chip (SoC) or core silicon.

If the radio in the MBB device is currently enabled by the user for a data connection, the device must be able to use in-band, USB resume signaling to wake the SoC or core silicon from modern standby. The SoC or core silicon must be able to wake from its lowest power state in response to in-band, USB resume signaling from the MBB device.

Network

Power management modes

The MBB device is expected to support five power-management modes.These modes are a combination of provisioned, connectivity, and radio power states. A transition from one mode to another is communicated to the device directly over the USB bus through commands from the Mobile Broadband Class Driver or USB device state transitions. Transitions between power management modes must not use external GPIO signaling.

The five power-management modes are:

Active

The radio is actively transmitting data or is actively connected to the cellular network.

Connected-sleep

The radio is provisioned on the network and a user account is enabled. The platform is in modern standby. The MBB device is waiting for data from the network to wake up the SoC, and also for events from the SoC. Average across 2G, 3G, LTE, and various DRX modes.

Radio-off

The radio is provisioned on the network, but Windows or the user has turned off the radio in the MBB device.

No-subscription

The user does not have an active subscription.

No-SIM

The device has no SIM.

The following table compares the five power-management modes.

Power management modeRadio power stateUSB device power state (Dx)Average power consumptionExit latency to active

Active

On

D0

Scenario-specific

N/A

Connected-sleep

On

D2 (selective suspend)

<= 15 milliwatts (device-specific)

USB D2 -> D0 <= 400 milliseconds (USB specification)

Radio-off

Off

D2 (selective suspend)

<= 5 milliwatts

USB D2 -> D0 < 400 milliseconds + Base station acquisition and registration (specific to location and carrier)

No-subscription

Off

D2 or D3

<= 3 milliwatts

N/A

No-SIM

Off

D2 or D3

<= 3 milliwatts

N/A

Note In no-subscription mode and no-SIM mode, an MBB device can be in either the D2 or D3 device power state, depending on whether the device supports D3.

The power consumption of the MBB device in each of the power modes shown in the preceding table will vary by radio implementation, network type, and distance from the cellular access point. Contact the radio manufacturer for information about the device-specific power consumption in each power management mode shown in the preceding table.

Software power management mechanisms

The two primary software power management mechanisms for the MBB device are the radio power state and the USB function power state.

Radio power state

The Windows Mobile Broadband Class driver will send a MBIM_CID_RADIO_STATE message to the MBB device with a command to turn the radio power state to on or off per the user's preference. When the user disables the radio, the Mobile Broadband Class driver will send the MBIM_CID_RADIO_STATE message with an MBIMRadioOff command.

USB selective suspend

The Windows Mobile Broadband Class Driver is a Windows Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) miniport driver. The Mobile Broadband Class Driver and NDIS collaborate to manage the power of the MBB device. Windows will transition the USB function of the MBB device to the USB suspend (or, in Windows terminology, selective suspend) state when the MBB device should be in a low-power mode. The transition to the USB suspend state is independent of the radio power state.

Windows will transition the MBB device to connected-sleep mode (USB suspend (D2) state) when the system enters modern standby and the device is provisioned on the network. During connected-sleep mode, the radio is on, and the MBB device is expected to generate USB resume wake signaling and return to the D0 state when the radio receives new data from the network that matches programmed wake patterns or when other enabled wake events occur. The power consumption in connected-sleep mode will vary by cellular technology and distance from the cellular access point.

Windows will transition the radio to radio-off mode (USB suspend (D2) state) when the system enters modern standby and the device is provisioned on the network, but the user has set the radio power state to off. In radio-off mode, the MBB device is expected to consume no more than five milliwatts on average. The following block diagram shows the control path for initiating the MBB device's transition to the USB suspend state.

If the MBB device has not been provisioned on the network by the user, Windows will transition the device to the no-subscription mode (D2 or D3 state) when the platform enters modern standby. When the device is in no-subscription mode, its radio power state is always off. When the MBB device is in the no-subscription mode during modern standby, the power consumption of the MBB device is expected to be equivalent to that of the radio-off mode. However, the MBB device must still remain physically enabled on the USB bus during the entire time that the device is in the no-subscription mode.

At all times—regardless of whether the platform is in modern standby—power must not be removed from the USB function portion of the MBB device. Otherwise, when power is removed, the device will fall off of the USB bus and cause the device to be reported as surprise-removed.

Note On modern standby platforms, there is no support for the execution of third-party driver or ACPI firmware to manage transitions of the MBB device between the power management modes previously described. All power management of the device must be done in-band through the USB bus.

Third-party driver and ACPI firmware is supported for Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) sensors, which change the MBB radio transmitter power in reaction to the proximity of the MBB antenna to the user.

Supported hardware power configurations

To meet the power management requirements of a modern standby platform, only one hardware configuration is supported—the MBB device must use USB to connect to the platform. Additionally, the USB-connected MBB device must:

  • Report that it is self-powered and remote-wake-capable in the USB configuration descriptor for the device.
  • Be attached to a system power rail that will be powered on at all times regardless of whether the platform is in modern standby.

Because there is no support for the execution of third-party driver or ACPI firmware for MBB device power management, there must be no GPIO lines connected from the MBB device to the SoC for use by the operating system or third-party driver software. All power management of the MBB device must be communicated in-band over the USB bus.

MBB module reset

The MBB device must undergo a reset when the platform enters the ACPI S5 (shutdown) system power state. This requirement exists so that the user can indirectly reset the MBB device if it is not responsive by selecting Restart from the Windows Power menu. In addition, this requirement ensures that the MBB device can be reset to detect a newly inserted or removed SIM.

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The system integrator should ensure that the system resets the MBB device using one of the following methods:

  • Reset in UEFI firmware: The system UEFI firmware can reset the MBB device on system boot. Note that Windows requires platforms that have non-rotational (solid-state) storage to complete power-on self test (POST) within two seconds. Resetting the MBB device must not cause this time to be exceeded.
  • Remove power with switchable power rail: The system integrator can design the platform power routing to remove power from the MBB device when the platform enters the S5 state. The removal of power from the device be accomplished by using a GPIO-controlled power switch or by placing the MBB device on a power rail that is disabled by the system power-management IC (PMIC) when the platform enters the S5 state.

Wake concerns

An MBB device that is in the USB suspend state must be able to wake the SoC by using USB resume signaling. The SoC must be able to wake from its lowest run-time idle state on detection of a USB specification-compliant resume-from-suspend signal from an attached USB device.

A USB-connected MBB device that is located inside the computer chassis will typically be self-powered. That is, the device draws its power from a system power rail instead of from the USB host controller to which it is attached. The reason for this requirement is that some MBB devices (depending on the cellular technology) require more than the USB specification-allotted suspend current to stay connected to the network during connected-sleep mode.

Testing and validation

The MBB device vendor, the system integrator, and the SoC designer should test the MBB device's USB power management and verify that it is functioning correctly. Specifically, the MBB device should transition to the D2 (USB suspend) device power state and stay in this state during modern standby when the device is not actively transmitting or receiving data. In addition, verify that the MBB device can use in-band USB resume signaling to wake the SoC from its deepest idle state when data is transmitted to the MBB device over the cellular network.

Power management checklist

System integrators, MBB device vendors, and SoC designers should review the checklist below to ensure that their system power management design is compatible with Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

  • Select a MBB device that implements support for the Windows Mobile Broadband Class Driver and the Mobile Broadband Interface Model (MBIM).

  • Windows includes all of the built-in software required to enumerate, describe, communicate with, and power-manage the MBB device. No additional software is required or supported.

    Verify that your MBB device does not require additional driver software or firmware support on the SoC for power management.

  • The MBB device hardware must:

    • Report the self-powered and remote-wake capabilities in the USB descriptor for the device.
    • Be capable of using in-band USB resume signaling to wake the SoC when data from the cellular network is ready for processing.
    • Not require any GPIO lines between the MBB device and the SoC to generate wake signaling or enter low-power modes.
    • Not generate spurious USB in-band wakes. The MBB device must wake the SoC only when data matching programmed patterns arrives for the SoC or other enabled wake events occur.
  • The MBB device must be reset when the platform enters the S5 (shutdown) system power state. The system integrator must either:

    • Reset the MBB module in system UEFI boot firmware during POST. Note that Windows requires a modern standby platform to complete POST within two seconds.
    • Place the MBB module on a power rail that is turned off when the platform is in the S5 state. The rail can be turned off by a GPIO-controlled switch or by the system PMIC.
  • The SoC used in the platform design must be capable of detecting a USB resume signal and waking from its lowest power state.

  • System integrators should verify that the power consumption of the MBB device in the radio-off and no-subscription modes meets the previously described requirements.

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The goal of Wi-Fi-connected testing is to identify activities that should not be happening during modern standby and resolve them. The activities might be a result of network activities, real-time notifications, or unexpected hardware interrupts.

After the system can reliably enter and exit modern standby and can achieve good results in modern standby with airplane mode on, you can validate modern standby system behaviors with Wi-Fi connected.

To prepare for WiFi-connected testing, the following two prerequisites must be met:

  • The system has a reliable Wi-Fi connection. The best way to assess this is to test the Wi-Fi connection during active use to make sure that the connection is stable and signal/speed is reasonably good.
  • The Wi-Fi device is compatible with the NDIS 6.3 feature to support wake on LAN (WoL) patterns, protocol offloads, and D0 packet coalescing. These capabilities are required so that the SoC can enter low-power states while the Wi-Fi device maintains connectivity.

The list of Wi-Fi-connected scenarios includes connectivity to communications apps and downloads from the Internet. These scenarios should be tested serially to focus on issues that might fix similar issues in other scenarios.The Windows Hardware Certification Kit (HCK) includes tests that help validate basic NDIS 6.3 functionality for modern standby. There are individual tests for each type of network adapter, including Wi-Fi, CDMA MBB, GSM MBB, and wired LAN. Please see the test details information for each test at Device.Network Testing.

We recommend that each network adapter in the system pass the following tests before you proceed to system-level connectivity testing for modern standby:

  • WLAN Connected Standby End to End - Basic
  • Win.MBN.CDMA.TestCSConnectivity
  • Win.MBN.GSM.TestCSConnectivity
  • LAN CS Test - IPv4 Basic

Modern standby push mail

Testing the push mail scenario ensures that the system can receive emails via the Mail app while the system is in modern standby. This allows users to receive the most up-to-date information immediately after the system resumes.

We recommend that you create a Microsoft account for testing purposes. You can use this account to set up the system to receive emails through the Mail app. Be sure that the system is running on AC power, then put it into modern standby. While the system is in modern standby, send an email to the account a few times. Wake up the system from modern standby and verify that all the emails are received. If Mail is configured to be on the lock screen, you should also see the badge updates occur just as the screen is powered on.

  • Test area: Push mail during modern standby.
  • Purpose: Ensure that push mail is functional during modern standby.
  • System configuration:
    • Factory image is installed on the system.
    • All drivers are loaded in Device Manager.
    • Factory Microsoft Store apps are installed.
    • System is running on AC power.
    • System is connected to a Wi-Fi access point (AP) that has Internet connectivity.
    • Mail app is configured with a test Microsoft account.
    • In Background Apps, Mail is set to On.
    • In Battery Usage:
      • Mail is set to Allow the app to run background tasks.
      • Mail is not set to Let Windows decide... or Reduce the work....
    • Email operation is first validated with the display on.
Test scenarioExpected resultTroubleshooting notes

The system can receive mail notifications while in modern standby.

If the Mail app is configured to be on the lock screen, updates should be seen on the lock screen immediately on resume from modern standby. Ensure all emails are received.

When a notification is not received, a trace is needed to diagnose the problem. For information about how to capture a trace and analyze the information, see Capture and View a WPA Trace for Modern Standby Diagnostics.

The Windows Hardware Certification Kit (HLK) includes modern standby tests that exercise entering and exiting modern standby on a system. Running the following tests will further validate the readiness of the system:

  • Modern standby basic verification test on AC-power
  • Modern standby basic verification test on DC-power

Modern standby instant messaging and video chat

NOTE: Skype no longer supports this functionality starting with version 8.61.

Instant-message and video-chat notifications are important Wi-Fi-connected scenarios. The goal of testing this scenario is to ensure users can receive instant messages and video calls in real-time while the system is in modern standby.

You can test the instant messaging scenario with Skype by putting the system into modern standby and sending an instant message to the test Microsoft account. You should observe that the system powers on the display when an instant message is received and shows an instant message toast notification on the lock screen.

After you verify that instant message notifications are working, try to make a video call and an audio conference call. When the system is in modern standby, make a video call to the Skype test account. You should observe that the system powers on the display and shows a ringing toast notification at the upper right hand corner. If you do not pick up the call and let it finish ringing, the system will immediately go back into modern standby.

When the system wakes from modern standby, make sure that all notifications are received as expected. When an instant message or a call is missed, the icon on the lock screen will show the number of missed messages and calls.

The instant messaging and video chat scenarios are enumerated in the following table. All modern standby systems should be tested for expected behavior for each scenario that is listed in the table.

  • Test area: Instant messaging (IM) and video chat during modern standby.
  • Purpose: Ensure that real-time incoming functionality is operational during modern standby.
  • System configuration:
    • Factory image installed on the system.
    • All drivers loaded in Device Manager.
    • Factory Microsoft Store apps are installed.
    • System is running on battery power.
    • System is connected to a Wi-Fi AP with Internet connectivity.
    • Skype app configured with test Microsoft account.
    • Skype IM and video chat are validated to work with the screen turned on (outside of modern standby).
    • Skype has been configured to run in the background on the Battery Settings page
Test scenarioExpected resultTroubleshooting notes

System can receive IM notifications during modern standby.

When the system wakes from modern standby, check that all IM messages have been received and that the badge on the lock screen is updated appropriately.

If a notification is not received, a trace is needed to diagnose the problem. See Capture and View a WPA Trace for Modern Standby Diagnostics for information on how to capture a trace and analyze the information.

System can receive video call and audio conference call notifications during modern standby.

Ensure that all calls received during modern standby are accompanied by notifications that do the following:

  • Turn on the display to show a toast in the upper right-hand corner.

If the call is missed, the icon on the lock screen will show the missed call when the system wakes from modern standby.

If a notification is not received, a trace is needed to diagnose the problem. See Capture and View a WPA Trace for Modern Standby Diagnostics for information on how to capture a trace and analyze the information.

Modern standby background download

Background download through a Wi-Fi connection is an important modern standby scenario to test. This scenario includes downloads from Windows Update for critical updates, and downloads of music and movies while the system stays in modern standby.

The goal of testing background download is to make sure that download is done in the background and does not continuously block the system from entering the lowest power state during modern standby. Note that background download is allowed to continuously block the system from using the lowest power state when the system is running on AC power. Testing background download on battery is required.

To test background downloads, it is best to test using a large file. You should also ensure the system is running on battery (not connected to AC) to get the correct behavior since systems on AC have special download policies to allow downloads to continue uninterrupted.

One way to test background download is use the inbox Video app to kick off a large download (over 3 gigabytes), and then put the system into modern standby. Windows permits the download to run through an activator in the Resiliency phase. Please see Prepare software for Modern Sleep for a conceptual overview of this software flow.

The key observation in the test is to verify that the large download does not prevent the system from entering Modern Sleep.

On resume from modern standby, you can run a SleepStudy report to view the time when the system was in Modern Sleep and, more specifically, DRIPS, to determine whether the background download was blocking the system from entering low power. For the best testing scenaio, the modern standby session should extend for at least one hour.

  • Test area: Background file download during modern standby.
  • Purpose: Ensure that a background download is performed at low-power operation during a modern standby session.
  • System configuration:
    • Factory image installed on the system.
    • All drivers loaded in Device Manager.
    • Factory Microsoft Store apps are installed.
    • System is running on battery power.
    • System is configured with a test Microsoft account for inbox Video app access.
Test scenarioExpected resultTroubleshooting notes

Background downloads

A large file download should not continuously prevent the system from entering the lowest power state after the first 20 minutes.

With the exception of Windows Update, which can be active for a long period of time due to downloads of critical/security updates, all other downloads should not be active beyond the initial 20 minutes of the modern standby session.

You can use SleepStudy to check whether the large file download prevented the system from entering the lowest power state for the entirety of the session.

Modern standby roaming connectivity

The most basic roaming connectivity scenario involves functional validation of network list offload (NLO). NLO is the capability of the Wi-Fi device to automatically roam between previously associated Wi-Fi networks, without the involvement of Windows running on the SoC.

NLO starts with Windows tracking the list of previously associated Wi-Fi networks. When the system transitions into modern standby, Windows communicates the list of previously associated Wi-Fi networks to the Wi-Fi device.

If connectivity to the associated Wi-Fi network is lost, the Wi-Fi device periodically searches for one of the previously associated Wi-Fi networks while the device operates in a very low power mode. The periodic scans for a previous network are performed without waking the SoC so that the SoC can stay in a low-power mode. When the Wi-Fi device detects a previously used network, it connects to the network and wakes the SoC. Windows completes the connection, including obtaining an IP address and re-establishing system connections, including Windows Notification Services (WNS).

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Start testing Wi-Fi roaming by setting up two Wi-Fi networks (A and B) with public Internet connections. Each Wi-Fi network should have a different SSID and be sufficiently distant so that the system cannot see both networks at the same time. Manually move the system near each Wi-Fi access point and connect to each network for a few minutes with the screen on and validate that Internet connectivity is functional. After the system has been demonstrated to connect to each Wi-Fi network reliably, you can start testing Wi-Fi roaming in modern standby.

Modern standby Wi-Fi roaming

The most basic roaming connectivity scenario involves functional validation of network list offload (NLO). NLO is the capability of the Wi-Fi device to automatically roam between previously associated Wi-Fi networks, without the involvement of Windows running on the SoC.

NLO starts with Windows tracking the list of previously associated Wi-Fi networks. When the system transitions into modern standby, Windows communicates the list of previously associated Wi-Fi networks to the Wi-Fi device.

If connectivity to the associated Wi-Fi network is lost, the Wi-Fi device periodically searches for one of the previously associated Wi-Fi networks while the device operates in a very low power mode. The periodic scans for a previous network are performed without waking the SoC so that the SoC can stay in a low-power mode. When the Wi-Fi device detects a previously used network, it connects to the network and wakes the SoC. Windows completes the connection, including obtaining an IP address and re-establishing system connections, including Windows Notification Services (WNS).

Start testing Wi-Fi roaming by setting up two Wi-Fi networks (A and B) with public Internet connections. Each Wi-Fi network should have a different SSID and be sufficiently distant so that the system cannot see both networks at the same time. Manually move the system near each Wi-Fi access point and connect to each network for a few minutes with the screen on and validate that Internet connectivity is functional. After the system has been demonstrated to connect to each Wi-Fi network reliably, you can start testing Wi-Fi roaming in modern standby.

  • Test area:Wi-Fi roaming operation during modern standby.
  • Purpose:Ensure that the system will automatically connect to previously used Wi-Fi networks during modern standby as the user moves the system between home, work, and coffee shops.
  • System configuration:
    • Factory image is installed on the system.
    • All drivers are loaded in Device Manager.
    • Factory Microsoft Store apps are installed.
    • System is running on battery power.
    • Wi-Fi connectivity is validated to work by connecting to the Internet while the screen is turned on.
Test scenarioExpected resultTroubleshooting notes

Wi-Fi connectivity is removed and the system automatically falls over to MBB while in modern standby.

Connect to the Wi-Fi network with MBB powered on, place the system into modern standby, and test push mail and Skype.

Mail and Skype calls should be received.

Power down the Wi-Fi access point and wait a few minutes for the system to automatically connect to the cellular network. Test push mail and Skype.

Mail and Skype calls should be received.

Power up the Wi-Fi access point again and wait a few minutes for the system to re-connect to Wi-Fi. Test push mail and Skype.

Mail and Skype calls should be received.

Make sure you first test Wi-Fi roaming in insolation before testing MBB failover.

Ensure that the system has a working cellular data connection.

If any part of the test fails, first have the Wi-Fi and MBB vendors help you verify that the device firmware has both WoL pattern and NLO capability enabled.

The test engineer for Wi-Fi roaming should build a close working relationship with the Wi-Fi vendor's support staff. Errors in this test should first be discussed with the Wi-Fi firmware developer.

A common problem is that the Wi-Fi device generates spurious SoC wake events because of false-positive NLO network detection events. This condition appears in SleepStudy as extra Wi-Fi device active time—typically, much more active time than any other PDC activator (such as BI, Windows Update, or WNS).

Modern standby Wi-Fi to MBB failover

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During modern standby, if Wi-Fi connectivity is lost, Windows automatically transitions to an available MBB connection. This behavior enables the system to remain constantly connected during modern standby. However, Windows will favor the cheaper, faster, and (typically) more power-efficient Wi-Fi connection over a cellular-based connection.

MBB and cellular connectivity are highly influenced by signal strength and proximity to a cellular tower. Make sure that the system under test has good cellular network connectivity before you test this scenario.

You should fully validate basic Wi-Fi roaming before you try to validate failover from Wi-Fi to MBB. The same Wi-Fi NLO technology that enables basic Wi-Fi roaming is critical to the operation of Wi-Fi to MBB failover.

The system under test should be configured to have an active cellular data plan and SIM card. The test setup should include a Wi-Fi access point with public Internet access. We recommend that you configure the system under test with a Microsoft account, and set up an additional device that is configured to initiate email and Skype calls.

Start the Wi-Fi to MBB failover testing by confirming that the system is connected to the Wi-Fi access point and has MBB access. You should validate that both network types are functional with the screen on. To do this, connect to Wi-Fi with the MBB radio off, and then connect to MBB with the Wi-Fi radio off. For each network connection, you should connect to the Internet and browse the web to verify IP connectivity.

Next, put the system in modern standby with both Wi-Fi and MBB radios turned on and the system connected to the Wi-Fi network. Use a Wi-Fi connection to test push mail and Skype during modern standby. While the system under test remains in modern standby, power down the Wi-Fi access point and wait a few minutes for the system to connect to the cellular network. After a few minutes, re-test push mail and Skype calls to validate that Windows automatically connected to the cellular network and re-established connectivity.

  • Test area:Wi-Fi to MBB transitions during modern standby.
  • Purpose:Ensure that the system automatically connects to Wi-Fi or MBB during modern standby.
  • System configuration:
    • Factory image installed on the system.
    • All drivers loaded in Device Manager.
    • Factory Microsoft Store apps are installed.
    • System is running on battery power.
    • Wi-Fi and MBB are validated to function correctly with the screen on and manually configured connections to each network.
Test scenarioExpected resultTroubleshooting notes

System can receive IM notifications during modern standby.

Ensure that all IMs received during modern standby are accompanied by sound notifications, while the display remains powered off. When the system wakes from modern standby, check that all IM messages have been received and that the badge on the lock screen is updated appropriately.

If a notification is not received, a trace is needed to diagnose the problem. See Capture and View a WPA Trace for Modern Standby Diagnosticsfor information on how to capture a trace and analyze the information.